Pauls Valley, OK, Pauls Valley Democrat

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April 11, 2014

Stepping forward: The real Colbert

CBS naming Stephen Colbert as David Letterman's replacement on "The Late Show" isn't too surprising. There were only so many plausible candidates (among talk show hosts, comedians, actors and raunchy E! personalities) who could take Letterman's place when he exits the long-running show next year. Letterman changed the late-night TV game between his run on NBC's "Late Night" and starting the "Late Show" franchise in 1993. And while it's tough to replace a pop-culture icon, Colbert, in terms of pedigree and sense of humor, makes the most sense.

"We've had the smartest guy in late night for many years, and replacing Dave was no small feat," CBS Entertainment President Nina Tassler told Broadcasting & Cable. "We feel that Stephen really respects Dave's legacy."

In the aftermath of CBS' announcement Thursday, there are so many questions - especially given Colbert's own legacy with the character he created on Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report." (In a statement that wished Colbert the best, Comedy Central officials indicated that the show will wrap up near the end of the year.) As far as the new "Late Show," CBS said "specific creative elements" - location, producers and a writing staff - will be announced later.

Here are some of the bigger questions lingering as the next big late-night shuffle looms.

1) How will Colbert play on CBS vs. Comedy Central?

It's hard to tell how the mainstream audience will feel - but in a lot of ways, Colbert is similar to Letterman, with his self-deprecating, biting sensibility. That could play well among Letterman fans. However, it's difficult to predict, because most of the late-night audience probably only knows Colbert from "The Colbert Report," playing the fake, ultra-right-wing cable-news host. Or, as he first described the character to The New York Times in 2005: "He's a well-intentioned, poorly informed, high-status idiot." Obviously, Colbert will just be himself on "The Late Show." But can late-night viewers separate the two? As we just saw with the #CancelColbert controversy - people were outraged when a joke on the show was presented out-of-context on Twitter - some people still don't get that Colbert's Comedy Central persona is satire.

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