At a May 2016 campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia, Donald Trump, the presumed GOP nominee for president, told the faithful: “If I win, we’re going to bring those miners back. You’re going to be so proud of your president. For those miners, get ready, because you’re going to be working your asses off.”

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With the passing of T. Boone Pickens on Wednesday, we immediately reflect on the kind of impact he had on Stillwater and the Oklahoma State University family. He is well known for his success in the oil industry. He built a few startups into an eventual powerhouse, earning billions along the way.

It is, sadly, the cost of loving an animal. It is a high cost, to be sure, but in truth a small price to pay for the years of love and companionship our pets give us.

Special prosecutor Robert Mueller's lengthy testimony before two U.S. House panels Wednesday revealed little the country didn't already know regarding his conclusions about Russian interference into the 2016 elections.

WASHINGTON – The Democratic presidential circus pitches its tent in Detroit this week. It will be especially entertaining if the presidential aspirants are asked some questions like these:

Warnings abound concerning the danger of saying “never again.” Most of us are guilty of making false promises on topics such as New Year’s resolutions, diets and exercise.

Brits have long been viewed as folks who seem bent on probing details of “whys” on many topics, some of them unlikely. Maybe it’s because they’ve been around a long time.

A minister friend--aware of ever-growing complications and mounting tonnage at the trough of trivia--often used the expression from the pulpit, in staff meetings and in conversation.

We’ve heard about the chances of being hit by lightning, winning the lottery or scoring a hole-in-one on the golf course, but nothing about the probability of two distinguished educators meeting up at a rodeo.

In wildest dreams, it never occurred to me that one day I’d write a piece referencing three bigger-than-life personalities. This day, I am.

It was bound to happen, and finally, it did. I overheard the words “artificial intelligence” and “fake news” mentioned in the same sentence.

A common practice when decision-makers arrive in Washington, D. C. is to check common sense at the door. There’s daily evidence of “bonehead” decisions that make us wonder about competencies.

Many Texans--and no doubt some abiding outside our borders--have used the expression for years: “He’ll do to ride the river with.”

They met in college at a time of comparative innocence. Father Knows Best was the rage on TV; Ken and Barbie weren’t yet a couple.

If a union organizer at a convention of robots urges “them” to unite, the rep might learn that “they” already have. Or, so it could appear.

If Walmart can offer the best-ever recipe for turning out world-class lemonade from lemons grown in their own orchard, folks will line up to buy it, whether or not they’re greeted at the store door.

For most of my adult life, I’ve bought into the “balance of nature” thing, perhaps ignited by reasonable absorption of elementary school “book learnin’” about plants, oxygen, carbon dioxide, tides and other stuff.

There was much to chatter about when Uncle Mort reached his mailbox down the lane. A neighbor on the next farm was fetching his mail too, the day was sunny and warm, and their chance meeting suggested that a protracted visit loomed.

A friend observed that we have arrived at the time of year when Americans take on the weighty matter of discussing weight loss. As a rule, that’s as far as it goes. As the wordsmith said, “When everything is said and done, usually more is said than done.” Talk is cheap.

For decades, four words have been used to magnify success achieved by remarkable individuals. The words? “Only in America could.”… Following this opening are tributes to support such a lofty claim.

This Week's Circulars

Obituaries

Funeral services for Bobby Glenn “Bob” Wingo will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, December 5, 2019 at the Hennepin Baptist Church. Interment will follow at the Hennepin Cemetery.

Surrounded by her family, Pamela Jane Johnson, 59, left this earth and the bonds of Parkinson's Disease to be with the Lord Thursday, November 28, 2019. Her funeral service will be held Tuesday, December 3 at 10 a.m. in the chapel at the Edmond Church of Christ in Edmond, Okla. Interment wil…