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Warnings abound concerning the danger of saying “never again.” Most of us are guilty of making false promises on topics such as New Year’s resolutions, diets and exercise.

Brits have long been viewed as folks who seem bent on probing details of “whys” on many topics, some of them unlikely. Maybe it’s because they’ve been around a long time.

A minister friend--aware of ever-growing complications and mounting tonnage at the trough of trivia--often used the expression from the pulpit, in staff meetings and in conversation.

We’ve heard about the chances of being hit by lightning, winning the lottery or scoring a hole-in-one on the golf course, but nothing about the probability of two distinguished educators meeting up at a rodeo.

In wildest dreams, it never occurred to me that one day I’d write a piece referencing three bigger-than-life personalities. This day, I am.

It was bound to happen, and finally, it did. I overheard the words “artificial intelligence” and “fake news” mentioned in the same sentence.

A common practice when decision-makers arrive in Washington, D. C. is to check common sense at the door. There’s daily evidence of “bonehead” decisions that make us wonder about competencies.

Many Texans--and no doubt some abiding outside our borders--have used the expression for years: “He’ll do to ride the river with.”

They met in college at a time of comparative innocence. Father Knows Best was the rage on TV; Ken and Barbie weren’t yet a couple.

If a union organizer at a convention of robots urges “them” to unite, the rep might learn that “they” already have. Or, so it could appear.

If Walmart can offer the best-ever recipe for turning out world-class lemonade from lemons grown in their own orchard, folks will line up to buy it, whether or not they’re greeted at the store door.

For most of my adult life, I’ve bought into the “balance of nature” thing, perhaps ignited by reasonable absorption of elementary school “book learnin’” about plants, oxygen, carbon dioxide, tides and other stuff.

There was much to chatter about when Uncle Mort reached his mailbox down the lane. A neighbor on the next farm was fetching his mail too, the day was sunny and warm, and their chance meeting suggested that a protracted visit loomed.

A friend observed that we have arrived at the time of year when Americans take on the weighty matter of discussing weight loss. As a rule, that’s as far as it goes. As the wordsmith said, “When everything is said and done, usually more is said than done.” Talk is cheap.

For decades, four words have been used to magnify success achieved by remarkable individuals. The words? “Only in America could.”… Following this opening are tributes to support such a lofty claim.

My Uncle Mort’s telephone is almost always warm, mostly due to the heat generated from his hand held firmly against his cheek, wherein is a jawbone that’s almost always yakking. 

I don’t know much about the Mormon Church, but I’ve always viewed most adherents as being generous with both their gifts and their time.

He stood there, gazing at the Salvation Army kettle on the town square. It was Christmas Eve, and my Uncle Mort--106 and counting--solemnly offered a “mental salute” to the woman as she joyfully rang her bell. Frail of body and warmed only by a tattered coat given to the Army last year, she …

“I don’t think he’s avoiding thoughts about the true meaning of Christmas, but his mind seems to wander off into the tall weeds about gifts that might be coming his way,” said Aunt Maude,” who has been “hitched” to Uncle Mort for more than 80 years.

Conversations about the life of President George H. W. Bush didn’t remain on shore as more than 3,000 folks left Galveston last week for a short cruise on the Carnival Valor. About the time we put out to sea, the United States’ 41st president was completing the final miles of life’s journey,…

‘Tis a puzzlement. Can anyone on the planet engage us to the degree that a 20th century icon did?

For more than 15 years, I’ve attempted to write pieces to elicit smiles--however faint--and/or to inspire. I believe a great majority of them have been “upbeat.”

If there should be an appeal for volunteers to search for innocence lost, misplaced or forfeited in recent decades, sign me up. The downward spiral has been gradual, unlike Dorothy’s sudden realization--upon her arrival at Oz’s Emerald City--that she and her friends weren’t in Kansas anymore. 

Just as “puppy love” is real to the puppy, so also are “thrill rides.” And, whether on land or sea, let’s leave it to participants to decide if such rides deserve to have the “thrill” adjective in their names. 

“You can look it up.” Late sports writing giant Blackie Sherrod was fond of using this quote. He repeated it often in a half-century of columns, attempting to keep sports in the context of a larger world.

The late Harry Truman, whom we always regarded as “unbridled” until here lately, advised folks affected adversely by the heat to stay out of the kitchen.

This Week's Circulars

Obituaries

Celebration of Life services for Donald Henry Kampbell, 88, of Stratford will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 14 at the Rollow Chapel of the First United Methodist Church of Ada with Rev. Brian Matthews and Rev. Waylon Dancer officiating.

Bob McMahan, 81, of Paoli passed away Wednesday, September 11, 2019 at the Norman Regional Healthplex.

Mikeal Lee Russell of Pauls Valley, Oklahoma was born on January 31, 1953 in Wynnewood, Okla., to Buster and Allie Elizabeth (Hayes) Russell and passed from this life on August 30, 2019 at the age of 66 years.

Charles H. Green of Paoli passed away September 11, 2019 in Norman, Oklahoma at the age of 72 years.

Janna Sue Field passed away peacefully on Sunday, September 1, 2019 at her home in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma at 64. Janna was born on June 21,1955 and grew up in Pauls Valley, graduating from PVHS in 1973. She graduated from OSU Tech in 1978 with a degree in Technical Illustration.